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This Is One Of The Reasons Why People Hate On Drake So Much

This Is One Of The Reasons Why People Hate On Drake So Much

“A wise man once said nothing”, Drake quoted. And perhaps this wasn’t the best thing to do at that moment, but lashing out back at Pusha would not be much the same. He could have responded, solely for the entertaining factor. It would at least grant us memes that will make us giggle like pigs. But Drake has been on top for so long, with music so different than it was before him, it was only a matter of time before people started to save their salty saliva to stir up some hatorade. Or is it perhaps simply a masculinity ting? People hate on Drake, because he talks too much about emotions. With statements like these, it shows that emotions got the best of these people.

Mankind has always had a knack for dragging people that do things differently. That’s no news. Hip hop has been slowly evolving like all things do, into something more diverse, more complex. The only constant is change, right? People have the right to romanticise a previous era. It brings up memories, and therefore joy. Nevertheless, this poisonous thought process, that breaks the spirit of creating differently, has been a struggle for me as well. I began to realise how dangerous this type of thinking is for growth and diversity. When people break barriers we tend to get scared of monsters that might come in and demonise our habits, which we creatures adore so much. Or is it more than simple barriers and are these structures that have been upheld for ages?

Men have learned to swallow their emotions with a dry mouth practically since they could walk. It’s something that has been systematically instilled in our minds, repeatedly whispered in our ears as programming in our most programmable years (age 3-11). So when our habits are endangered by something that we do not understand fully, we grab our sword and shield and start swinging. When Drake started talking about calling our exes at 4 AM wondering why they aren’t picking up, we swiftly categorised Draking and Driving as a DUI. Discussing masculinity is not about stripping men from their own characteristics. It’s about stopping to define these characteristics as particularly male. As if this is the only way you can behave and no way else. The hip hop industry has been labeling Drake as too soft, too emotional and therefore too feminine as a faulty cause. And the album Scorpion lyrically and beat wise shows that these comments and rumours are getting under Drake’s skin. He tries to compensate it with side A of the album, which seems to be more aggressive and upbeat. With songs like Mob Ties it simply shows that Drake is a force to be reckoned with and that perhaps he is not afraid to get his hands dirty (but that’s another discussion).

Drake has mastered the alchemy of blending hip hop and r&b to get everyone’s attention: men, women, actually all genders and probably dogs too. Hell, I’ve actually heard dogs howling after hearing Jungle from the album If You’re Reading This, It’s Too Late. He speaks to a wider audience, about subjects that have affected the most in this digital era. However, I will not sit here and defend Drake like he is my own blood, because everyone has his demons that are problematic (sexual objectification, parenting??, promoting violence). All I am trying to say is listen to your emotions when that hotline bling.

I will not share the album, you will probably not have a hard time finding it on Spotify or any major social media website.

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